Category: Related Surnames

The Long and Winding Road of Genealogy, Part 2

Continued from Part 1 …

Allesandro (Alex) Zambotti Family Weston 1940s

Alessandro (Alex) Zambotti with wife Mary Dallachiesa, photographed in Weston, PA – 1940’s

If you remember our last post, I am now corresponding with Melissa Stidom and Arleen Dallachiesa. We have determined their shared ancestors are Clemente Dallachiesa and Maria Zambotti, and that Melissa and Arleen are 2nd cousins, once removed (as well as 3rd cousins with me!).

Both cousins have provided me with information on their family lines, stretching back three generations. I compiled all of the info into one long list and began the task of verifying and mapping the family genealogy. My main resource for checking ancestors born in Castelfondo is a large digital archive I maintain on my hard drive. The file contains copies of original baptismal, marriage and death records from the village church spanning about four hundred years. For those born in America I use records from Ancestry.com, FamilySearch, Find-A-Grave and other online genealogy resources. Slowly I began to piece together birth dates, matched up spouses, found additional births of children who did not survive to adulthood, and added as much information as possible to our original family list. I also included Clemente’s parents, Pietro Dallachiesa (1816-1855) and Barbara Marchetti (1818-1895) along with his four siblings, expanding my research back one more generation. Remember – I already had an extensive genealogy for Maria Zambotti, Clemente’s wife, because she is the sister of my great-grandmother Oliva Zambotti Genetti. I have records dating this family back six generations for their Zambotti line, twelve generations for their Genetti line, and three generations for their Covi line.

Fortunato (Tuno) & Grace Dallachiesa 1963

Fortunato (Tuno) and Grace Dallachiesa, 1963. Tuno is the son of Clemente Dallachiesa and Maria Zambotti. Tuno and Grace are also the grandparents of Arleen Dallachiesa.

As I sorted through Clemente’s siblings (Maria, Antonio, Pietro and Catterina), I was surprised to find numerous matches between the Dallachiesa family and the Zambotti family. This is when the research REALLY became interesting!

If you are familiar with the Genetti family of Pennsylvania, you also know there are numerous marriages between Zambotti and Genetti ancestors from this branch of the family. As I continued my research, it became evident that the three families overlapped in many places.

Yikes – it became so confusing that I had to diagram the relationships in order to enter them correctly into our tree! If not careful, it’s easy to duplicate a person that appears on two different branches of the tree and is related to multiple ancestors from different families.

Here’s what I found when I combined the Dallachiesa research with the genealogy of my own Genetti-Zambotti family line:

  • Maria Dallachiesa (1841-1917) marries Francesco Mattia Covi (1834-1886) who is the uncle of Simone, Maria, Oliva and Lucia Zambotti (the brother of their mother, Maria Domenica Covi).
  • Clemente Dallachiesa (1844-1905) marries Maria Zambotti (1854-1906) who is the sister of Simone, Oliva and Lucia Zambotti.
  • Catterina Dallachiesa (1853-1939) marries Simone Zambotti (1852-1923) brother of Maria, Oliva and Lucia Zambotti.
  • Damiano Genetti marries Oliva Zambotti (1861-1938) who is the sister of Simone, Maria and Lucia Zambotti.
  • Rafaele Genetti, brother of Damiano, marries Lucia Zambotti (1865-1952) who is the sister of Simone, Maria and Oliva Zambotti.
  • Pietro Zambotti (1881-1966), son of Simone Zambotti and Catterina Dallachiesa, marries Ottilia Genetti (1890-1985), the daughter of Damiano Genetti and Oliva Zambotti.
  • (Giuseppe) Alessandro Zambotti (1878-1951), son of Simone Zambotti and Catterina Dallachiesa, and brother of Pietro, marries Mary Dallachiesa (1882-1967), daughter of Clemente Dallachiesa and Maria Zambotti.
  • Simone, Maria, Oliva and Lucia Zambotti’s grandmother was Maria Barbara Genetti (1796-1844), married to Simone Zambotti (1786-1874). She was the 4th cousin, once removed of Damiano and Rafaele Genetti of Pennsylvania (and the aunt to Vigilio Genetti, who’s branch of the Genetti family immigrated to Illinois – see past blog post). The father of Simone, Maria, Oliva and Lucia – Alessandro Zambotti, (whose mother was Maria Barbara Genetti) also had a grandmother on his father’s side who was Lucia Genetti (1761-1816). At the time of this writing, I have yet to find the connection of Lucia to the rest of the Genetti family tree.

Are you completely confused? I certainly was! But clearly, the Dallachiesa family was closely related to the Genetti family and should be added to our ongoing genealogy project.

With the final results of this extensive ancestral dig completed – we added 70 new names and 20 photographs to our online tree, plus found many pieces of our family puzzle. Special thanks to Arleen Dallachiesa and Melissa Stidom for their wonderful contributions!

And yet – there’s still more to this story!

To be continued …

The Long and Winding Road of Genealogy, Part 1

Maria and Clemente Dallachiesa and family.

Maria Zambotti and Clemente Dallachiesa, married 1875. Family portrait, circa. 1887-1888, photographed in Castelfondo.

Genealogy doesn’t always follow a straight, clear path. Sometimes you start researching one branch of the family and before you know it, you’re lost in a maze of in-laws, family cross-overs and distant cousins leading to a completely different surname! Although often confusing, it’s worth the effort to travel down side streets, for they all contain a hidden surprise!

That’s exactly what happened to me during the past month. I was contacted by three different cousins, looking for info on their ancestors. Although indirectly related to the Genetti clan, I took on the task of researching their family connections and was amazed at what I discovered!

I knew most families who came from Castelfondo, Italy (Austria) were interrelated. It’s a small village and your choice of a marriage partner was usually limited. Marriages were often arranged between families and it was common for distant cousins to marry. By the time I finished putting together the puzzle pieces of this branch (which includes the surnames of Dallachiesa, Zambotti, Marchetti, Genetti, Ianes and Turri – all from Castelfondo) I had a clearer picture of just how complicated cousin connections can be when your family originates from a small town in the Italian Alps!

Since this is a long, complicated story … I’ll break it into several blog posts. You’ll soon see why!

Fred Dallachiesa (1921-2014)

Fred Dallachiesa (1921-2014)

First let’s start with Arleen Dallachiesa. Arleen contacted me back in June (see past blog post). She already had a good family genealogy mapped out and was wondering about the connection of her father Fred Dallachiesa to the Genetti family, since she believed Fred and Gus Genetti Sr. were cousins. It didn’t take long to find the connection – Fred’s grandmother was Maria Zambotti Dallachiesa (1854-1906), older sister to Gus’s mother Oliva Zambotti Genetti (1861-1938). Fred and Gus were first cousins, once removed. Plus Maria and Oliva’s grandmother, who married into the Zambotti family, was Maria Barbara Genetti (1796-1844), an ancestor of the Genetti branch who immigrated to Illinois. So Arleen was related to me twice, as a 3rd cousin through the Zambotti family and a 4th cousin through the Genetti family.

Gus Genetti Sr. (1892-1976)

Gus Genetti Sr.
(1892-1976)

I decided to add Arleen’s great-grandparents, Maria Zambotti and Clemente Dallachiesa (1844-1905) to our online tree since they were related to the Genetti family through two different branches. Arleen and I kept in-touch for several months, solving a few mysteries and swapping research.

Then a month ago, I received a request through Ancestry.com from Melissa Stidom. She was looking for information on her 2nd great-grandfather, Clemente Dallachiesa. Wow, I thought, what were the chances of two cousins (who did not know each other) contacting me through the Dallachiesa family connection! I knew that Melissa was certainly related to Arleen! After counting the generations, I concluded Arleen and Melissa were 2nd cousins, once removed. Both were related through the Dallachiesa, Zambotti and Genetti families. This was just too much of a coincidence! I knew I had to dig deeper into our shared family connections – and that’s when my research took an unusual turn down a new road of discovery!

To be continued …

 

A Mystery Marriage!

Pennsylvania marriage record for Mary Genetti to Christopher Martini, 1885. Click to enlarge.

Pennsylvania marriage record for Mary Genetti to Christopher Martini, 1885. Click to enlarge.

Don Lingousky and his wife, Joyce, have done it again! While searching through old marriage records online, Don stumbled upon an intriguing mystery. He promptly emailed me with his findings and the three of us went to work digging for evidence. Don’s clue had uncovered an unknown marriage for our 2nd great-aunt, Anna Maria “Mary” Genetti Zambotti (1859-1937), daughter of Leone and Cattarina Genetti.

If you remember past posts, Don and I are 3rd cousins. My great-grandfather, Damiano Genetti (1857-1944), was the brother of Don’s great-grandmother, Angeline Maddalena Genetti Recla (1865-1937). And the great-aunt in question, Mary Genetti Zambotti, was the sister of Damiano and Angeline. During the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, the three siblings, along with their younger brother, Rafaele (1867-1949), established themselves as entrepreneurial business owners in the towns of Weston, Hazleton and Sheppton, Pennsylvania.

Don and Joyce are great genealogy sleuths and have added many wonderful finds to our family website. Don’s sharp eye caught an interesting notation on the marriage record issued to Peter Zambotti and Mary Genetti in 1896 – strangely Mary’s maiden name is listed as Martini, not Genetti!

2nd Pennsylvania marriage record for Mary (Genetti) Martini and Peter Zambotti, 1896. Click to enlarge.

2nd Pennsylvania marriage record for Mary (Genetti) Martini and Peter Zambotti, 1896. Click to enlarge.

According to the certificate, Mary had been married before, with the first marriage dissolved due to death. None of our records stated that Mary Genetti was married twice! Nor was this reflected in our family tree. Don went back and searched again, soon finding Mary’s first marriage record. It had been overlooked since the names of both husband and wife were misspelled by the attending clerk.

Mary’s first marriage was to Christopher Martini in December of 1885. This life event had slipped through the historic cracks of time, probably escaping our family memory because there were no descendants from Mary and Christopher’s short marriage.

Since the marriage took place in 1885, there was also no record of the couple in the missing 1890 federal census. Due to the lack of historical documents, we had no idea who Christopher Martini was, how he had died nor the date of his death. (Genealogy Note: the 1890 federal census was destroyed by fire in 1921 with the majority of the records lost.)

MaryPeterZambotti

Mary Genetti and Peter Zambotti, probably 1895 or 1896.

Don, Joyce and I consulted various genealogy websites and data bases. Finally we located Christopher’s birth record in the Italian registry maintained by Nati in Trentino (see explanation below). Like Mary, Christopher was a fellow Tyrolean born in the neighboring village of Revo on July 25,1852. His baptismal name was Cristoforo Mattia Martini. And his birth date closely matched the wedding register. Although we have no evidence to tie this birth record to Mary’s first husband, we are fairly sure this was the same “Christopher”.

Unfortunately a good deal more digging, turned up no further info – no death certificate or obituary, no tombstone, no family trees with the name of Cristoforo “Christopher” Martini. All we know is that he died sometime between 1885 and 1895.

According to Mary’s second marriage record dated January of 1896, she married Peter Zambotti, a fellow Tyrolean from her home village of Castelfondo. Peter had arrived in America just the year before in 1895.

The couple had one child, a son named John born in 1897 who died at the young age of thirty. We know this because John is noted in the 1900 and 1920 Federal Census. He also has a WW I draft registration card on file and we were able to locate his Pennsylvania death certificate. Plus we had photos of John’s tombstone in the Weston, PA cemetery where both of his parents were buried.

JohnZambotti

John Zambotti Smardo 1897 – 1927, Sacred Heart Cemetery, Weston, PA

While researching this story, I took a closer look at the photo of John’s marker. In 2012 I had spent some time photographing tombstones in the Sacred Heart Cemetery where many of my ancestors are buried. When I found the photo of John Zambotti’s marker on my hard drive, an interesting surprise was clearly visible on the stone. His name was engraved “John Zambotti Smardo”. The unfamiliar name of “Smardo” was also on his death certificate. Joyce and I mulled this over for a few days and came to the conclusion that John must have been adopted by Mary and Peter. “Smardo” was his birth surname. We ran this hypothesis past Don. It was then that he remembered his grandmother’s family history had listed John Zambotti as being adopted. Another mystery solved! Sadly, John passed away in 1927 from tuberculosis. His occupation was listed as “miner”, he was single and left no heirs.

Thank you once again Don and Joyce Lingousky for your tenacious research! I have made updates to our family tree and corrected the ancestral record.

Note: If you are researching your Tyrolean ancestors, a data base of births can be accessed at: Nati in Trentino. Available in six languages (including English), records are listed for the years 1815 through 1923. The website explains: “With the Treaty of Vienna in 1815, Trentino was annexed to the Tyrol County. From that year until after the Great War – until December 31st, 1923, to be precise – the birth registers were maintained by the parishes, which also acted as registry offices. While many registry rolls were lost, those remaining were transferred onto microfilm in the 1980’s to facilitate consultation. The details of these individuals (approximately 1.28 million in all) have now been collected, in a project lasting several years, in an Index made available to academics and anyone wishing to retrace the history of their family.”

Click here to access Nati in Trentino.

Welcome to New Cousins!

angela mary ralph peter

Left to right: Angela Maddalena Genetti, Ralph (Raffael) Recla, Peter Zambotti and Anna Maria (Mary) Genetti. About 1895. Photo contributed by Don Lingousky.

The past few weeks have been exceptionally busy with emails from new cousins who have stumble upon The Genetti Family Genealogy Project. Along with answering emails, I’ve been busy tracking down our shared ancestry so we can enter their family information on our tree.

We’d like to welcome Vicki Recla Underwood Simpson and Ralph Bones to our family genealogy project. Vicki and Ralph are first cousins from the Genetti/Recla branch. Their shared ancestors are grandparents Lawrence Leo Recla and Kathryn Piz. Lawrence was the son of Raffael Recla and Angela Maddalena Genetti of Sheppton, Pennsylvania. Vicki and Ralph have already supplied me with twenty-five descendants for our family tree. We look forward to their future contributions of photos and information about the Recla clan.

Do you remember Don Lingousky from past posts and contributions to this website? Well it turns out that Don is Vicki and Ralph’s second cousin, as well as a great researcher of his own family ancestry. Don’s grandmother, Leonela Recla, was the sister of Ralph and Vicki’s grandfather, Lawrence. Emails have already been exchanged between Recla cousins and I’m sure they will be comparing ancestral notes soon. (FYI – I am Vicki and Ralph’s third cousin because we share the same great-great-grandparents, Leone and Cattarina Genetti).

The tombstone of Col. Emil Joseph Genetti, Fort Logan National Cemetery, Denver, CO.

The tombstone of Col. Emil Joseph Genetti, Fort Logan National Cemetery, Denver, CO.

Also we would like to welcome Francesco Marchetti of Trentino, Italy. Francesco wrote me several weeks ago searching for information on his American cousins. His family, likes ours, is from the village of Castelfondo in northern Italy. Francesco’s 3rd great-aunt, Maria Marchetti, came to America in 1913 and married Pietro Genetti, also of Castelfondo. Their life in America and the amazing legacy that their children built deserves its own blog post! I am still researching this interesting family, but for now I can tell you that Maria and Pietro represent a new branch of our family that I have yet to add to the Genetti tree. The couple settled in Michigan, had three sons and their lives are well-documented through the Federal Census and newspaper articles. Plus I have uncovered several living descendants and hope they will eventually connect with our website, adding their own stories and photos. The great-grandchildren of Maria and Pietro, now living in various locals throughout the United States, are Francesco’s third cousins.

The story deepens because I am also from the Marchetti-Genetti families. After doing the math and counting the generations, I concluded that Francesco is my 6th cousin, once removed (Francesco is a generation younger than me). And I am also related to Maria and Pietro’s descendants – twice! Their grandchildren are my 5th cousins through the Genetti family, and my 6th cousins through the Marchetti family.

Within a few weeks, I will write the complete story of Maria, Pietro and their sons, Emil Joseph (Primo), Albert and Florian. My sincere thanks (mille grazie!) to Francesco for contacting our website and beginning the research into his fascinating family!

A final note – due to the many Genetti ancestors and their descendants who have served in the military, I have decided to compile a page honoring our family’s military history. If you would like to note family members on this page, please email photos, military history, documents, etc. to: info.genetti.family@gmail.com. I will do my best to create a suitable tribute to our family in uniform.

 

More Photos!

Betty Zambotti's High School Diploma

Betty Zambotti’s High School Diploma,
dated June 11, 1930

A special thank you to Lewis Reich, son of Betty Zambotti and Lewis J. Reich, grandson of Tillie Genetti and Peter Zambotti. Lewis emailed me a wedding portrait of his parents along with his mother’s high school diploma. They have both been added to our ever-growing collection of family photographs in the Gallery Section.

Stop by the Photography Page to see our many ancestor portraits – all descendants of the Genetti Family.

If you have photographs or memorabilia you would like to share on our family website, please send them in jpg format to info.genetti.family(at)gmail.com. I look forward to hearing from you!

A Case of Mistaken Identity!

Villages of Castelfondo and Ofena

Map of modern-day Italy showing the villages of Ofena in southern Italy and the village of Castelfondo in northern Italy.

Several weeks ago I received a curious email from a gentleman with the surname of Genetti. According to his email, “D. Genetti’s” family had settled in New England in the 1920’s. He gave me the names of his great-grandparents, but missing was information about their village of origin in Italy. I had heard of a Genetti family in this part of the country, but had never come across their ancestry in my research. Since most branches of our family settled in mining areas of the United States, I’ve found it easy to track the immigration of each branch to a specific coal mining region of this country. But I had not found any branch of the Genetti family (originally from Castelfondo) who emigrating to Massachusetts.

In his second email, my new Genetti contact provided a detailed family tree, extending back nine generations, beginning with Giovanni Genetti (1737-1839). I responded enthusiastically – yes! I would be happy to include his genealogy on our online family tree. But first it was necessary to document and verify the names and dates on his tree. I had learned from past experience that information provided without resource documentation can often contain errors. So I set about researching his ancestors. What I found was a complete surprise!

Here’s my response email to D. Genetti:

“According to your tree, the earliest Genetti ancestor is Giovanni Genetti (1737-1839). I was unable to locate him on our ancestral tree (which dates back to 1461) nor in the Castelfondo baptismal records. I did further searching on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org, but without any luck. Then I attempted to search for recent ancestors on your tree that were born in Italy and emigrated to the USA. Still I found none of these relatives in the data bases with the name of Genetti.

My last resort was searching for derivative spellings of Genetti. I then found an Italian family tree on Ancestry.com with five generations of your relatives listed along with corresponding birth and death dates – but their name was spelled “Genitti” and they were from Ofena, L’Aguila, Italy – not Castelfondo, Tyrol. When I searched FamilySearch.org for Genitti, I found results that matched what I had found on Ancestry.com.

Unfortunately, I’m sorry to tell you our families are not related. Without records proving that they are from the Val di Non region of Trentino (Tyrol) I can’t enter them into our online family tree since there would be no connecting ancestor. My guess, is that your surname was changed as some point after your family emigrated to the United States. This was a common occurrence. I suggest researching your family through Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org as well as the baptismal records from Ofena, Italy under the surname of Genitti. You may be able to go back much further in the records with the original surname.” (end of email)

As a genealogist, I have an insatiable curiosity! I had to know more about this family. So after sending my email (and not feeling very good about breaking this surprising news concerning a mistaken surname!), I continued digging to find answers. Here’s what I found. “D. Genetti’s” 2nd great-grandfather arrived in Canada from Italy in 1921 under the name Pasquale Genitti. The family must have traveled to the United States soon after, settling in Massachusetts. That same year, Pasquale’s son, Giuseppe married and the Massachusetts Marriage Index lists his name interestingly as “Giuseppe Genetti”. The 1930 Federal Census states the family’s surname is “Genett”. And in the 1940 Census, it becomes “Genetti”. Misspelled names are a common occurrence in the census since it is the sole responsibility of the census taker to notate the information correctly. Unfortunately, names were often written phonetically, and therefore misspelled. The errors on the 1930 and 1940 censuses could account for the family simply adopting a new version of their name.

However, other documentation provided the following information. World War I and World War II registration cards, as well as naturalization documentation for one of Giuseppe’s immediate family members, states the surname to be “Genitti”. And the Social Security Death Index states that Giuseppe’s own surname at the time of his birth in 1890 and at his death in 1968 was “Genitti”. But whomever had constructed their detailed family tree, had decided to use the surname “Genetti” throughout, rather than reflect the new name within the generation that had adopted the change. It was obvious that my email friend was two to three generations separated from his family’s name change and not aware of the true origins of his ancestry.

Hopefully the information provided in this “case of mistaken identity” was not too shocking. I trust it will be used as positive motivation to research the family’s true roots, ancestry and culture.

 

New Book – The Tyroleans: A Journey of Hope

TheTyroleansJust added to our family Book Store – a lively account of a Tyrolean emigrant family. Read my review:

The Tyroleans: A Journey of Hope, A true story of a remarkable people and their emigration to America, (this is an Amazon affiliate link, click on title for information or to purchase), by David A. Prevedel, published in 2010. Available as a paperback through Amazon, price: $17.95. The minute you open this book, you know it’s a labor of love and a tribute to the author’s Tyrolean roots. David’s grandparents, (Giuseppe and Ester Rauzi, Floriano and Angelina Prevedel), all emigrated from the Val di Non in Austria (Italy). They, along with many other families from the villages of Brez, Castelfondo, Traversara, Fondo, Cloz and Tret, settled in Wyoming. At first they worked the coal mines in Superior and Rock Springs. After saving enough money, many families moved to Utah, becoming farmers and opening businesses. The author draws inspiration from in-person interviews conducted over the years with his Tyrolean relatives, friends and their descendants. Mr. Prevedel weaves family stories together with historical details, to create a lively and sometimes, humorous portrayal of Tyrolean immigrants building a new life in America. He touches upon the origin and history of Tyrol, as well as the affect World War I had on the people of the Val di Non. Continuing to Wyoming and Utah, the author provides a glimpse into life during the 1920’s and 30’s, Prohibition, the Great Depression, becoming an American citizen, the role World War II played in the lives of Tyrolean immigrants, and the post war years. Not only did I find Mr. Prevedel’s book warmly human and heartfelt, but this small volume truly captures the reality our Tyrolean ancestors experienced in a new land. Sprinkled throughout “The Tyroleans“, I recognized many surnames from my own research and from our Genetti family tree: Corazza, Menghini, Anselmi, Rauzi, Segna, Cologna and yes, even Genetti. Matter-of-fact, I believe David Prevedal’s book has provided a new clue to another branch of our family I have yet to research. I thoroughly enjoyed this touching memorial to a Tyrolean family and highly recommend it to anyone with ancestral roots in the Val di Non.

Stop by our online family Book Store to see all of our selections, click here!

Shop for family mugs, t-shirts, mouse pads, glassware and family tree prints at our online Genetti Shop, click here!

A Surprising Discovery!

The Genetti Family Tree

The Genetti Family Tree

About a week ago, I broke through a genealogy brick wall that had blocked my research for some time on a particular branch of my direct line. The results were a surprising discovery that shocked even me! Here’s the story.

For the past few months I’ve spent a lot of time researching the Genetti family that settled in Illinois. This branch of the tree has many unusual stories with plot twists that have captured my interest. The descendants I’ve worked with are distant cousins that I’m related to twice since one set of their Genetti great-grandparents were fourth cousins. Usually I’ve found our kindred relationship to be eighth cousins through Cipriano Genetti (1811-1890) and fifth cousins, once or twice removed through his wife Catterina Genetti (1812-1875). When you look at our family tree pictured above, their family is located on the far left bottom corner and my family occupies the far right branches located half way up from the bottom right corner.

As I sat at my desk last week, researching ancestors and checking against the tree hanging on the wall before me, something caught my eye and clicked in my brain.

Oliva 1920s-b

Oliva Zambotti Genetti
1861-1938

To understand my discovery, we need to switch gears and talk about my great-grandmother, Oliva Zambotti. She married Damiano Genetti in 1886. I had worked on the Zambotti genealogy stretching back to the early 1700’s, but always hit a wall when it came to Oliva’s grandmother, Barbara Genetti (my 3rd great-grandmother) who married Alessandro Zambotti. Yes her maiden name was also Genetti! Up until this point, I had found no information on Barbara’s parents, Giovanni Battista Genetti (1767-1811) and Maria Domenica Corazza (1776-1854). Nor was I able to go back any further in this ancestral line. I assumed they were from the Genetti family with roots in the villages of Fondo or Dambel – a distant relation to the Castelfondo Genettis, with our common ancestor existing sometime before the mid-1500s.

As I studied the family tree that afternoon, I realized I had been looking for Barbara’s parents in the wrong place. There before me I saw their names. Giovanni Battista Genetti and Maria Dominica Corazza (my 4th great-grandparents) were ancestors of the Illinois Genetti family and on their branch of the tree! I had been researching Giovanni and Maria all along for their descendants and never made the connection. That means my 4th great-grandparents through my Zambotti great-grandmother were also the 4th great-grandparents for many of the Illinois Genetti descendants – they were the same people! My great-grandmother, Oliva, was first cousins, once removed with their Illinois patriarch in America, Vigilio Genetti. Oliva’s grandmother, Barbara Genetti Zambotti, was Vigilio’s aunt!

This changed everything! I was shocked at first, as I never considered that my Zambotti line had a Genetti ancestor from the 1700’s (although there have been four Genetti-Zambotti marriages in my family since 1886, including my great-grandparents).

Since Barbara Genetti’s parents (with their very long genealogy) were already part of my online family tree, I simple plugged in my great-grandmother Oliva’s connection and she instantly had Genetti ancestors going back to the 1400’s – sharing five ancestors from 1650 to 1491 with her husband Damiano. This means that my great-grandparents are 5th cousins, once removed – and Oliva is actually 6th cousins with her own children!

Getting back to the Illinois clan, I am related to Vigilio’s descendants through both of my great-grandparents – and through four common ancestors – Pietro Genetti 1650-1706, Giovanni Battista Genetti 1746-1807, Giovanni Battista Genetti 1767-1854 and Domenica Corazza 1776-1854. For many of Vigilio’s descendants, I am their 5th cousin (3 times!) as well as their 8th cousin. I wonder what our DNA results would look like? What kind of match could be determined by having so many common relatives? If anyone from the Illinois Genetti family would like to have their DNA tested through Ancestry.com (where my DNA results are based), let me know. I’m sure it would be absolutely fascinated to see the results!

If you are interested in purchasing a fine art print of the Genetti Family Tree, stop by our Shop for details on how to order your own piece of our ancestry. Click here!

 

 

New Photos Added

ErminiaReclaFamily

Erminia and Emmanuel Recla with their family. Children are Ralph, Elaine (in lap), Catherine (standing), Esther, Marie and Emma.
Spokane, WA – 1914.

Thank you to Mary Russell for sending me two family photos. Mary is the great-granddaughter of Erminia Enrica Genetti Recla.

The youngest child of Leone and Cattarina Genetti, Erminia was born in Castelfondo, Austria (Italy) in the year 1876. She arrived in America in 1890 at the age of 13. The ship’s passenger list shows that she traveled with her big brother Damiano, who escorted her across the ocean and then returned to his family in Castelfondo.

MaryHarryPettis

Marie Recla and her husband Harry Pettis – early 1920’s.

Since most of Erminia’s large family was already living in Pennsylvania, she was not alone. Her older sister Angela, had married a young man by the name of Raphael Recla in 1887. Angela must have introduced her little sister to Raphael’s brother, because a few years later in 1893 Erminia married Emmanuel Recla. The couple set-up housekeeping in Shepton, PA near Angela and Raphael, where their first two children were born. By 1897 they were living in Michigan and five more children followed. The family moved again around 1907 to Spokane, Washington and four more children were added to the large family. Of Erminia and Emmanuel’s eleven children, eight survived to adulthood.

Erminia passed away in 1972 at the ripe old age of 95. She was laid to rest next to Emmanuel (who passed away in 1939) in Holy Cross Cemetery – Spokane, WA. Erminia was the last surviving sibling of her family.

The interesting part of this story is that I met Mary Russell, Erminia’s great-granddaughter, through Ancestry.com when our DNA results came up as a match. Mary’s test results matched mine as “extremely high probability for 3rd or 4th cousins”. And sure enough, our “shared ancestor hint” correctly predicted that we shared common 2nd great-grandparents, Leone and Cattarina Genetti. Our great-grandparents, Erminia and Damiano, were siblings. This made Mary and I third cousins. I’m so glad that science brought us together and I have yet another lovely person to call cousin!

And one more twist to the story – I recently worked on an ancestral genealogy for Don Lingousky, the great-grandson of Angela Genetti Recla (see blog post from March 26, 2015). Don had emailed me directly, providing information and photos for our family tree. Since Don and Mary shared both a Genetti and a Recla ancestor (two Genetti sisters marrying two Recla brothers) and they were both interested in their family’s genealogy, it was only natural that they should meet. After several emails between the three of us, Don and Mary are now working on their Recla ancestry together. As it turns out – Don, Mary and I are all third cousins through the Genetti family. Don and Mary are also third cousins through the Recla family – therefore they are twice related. I bet they share a very interesting DNA match!

Make sure to visit our ever-growing Photograph page in the Gallery section of The Genetti Family Genealogy Project. You might also enjoy reading about the Genetti clan on our Family Stories page.

Sorting Out Cousins

In an earlier blog post I confessed my penchant for figuring out family tree kinship. You know … things like 3rd cousin, twice removed, etc., etc. Well the other day something happen that really challenged my abilities to discern relationships. Here’s the story:

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Angeline Marchetti Genetti – photographed around 1950

I was browsing the posts on an obscure forum called “Trentino Genealogy and Culture“, looking for tidbits that might offer an ancestral clue. I’ve learned that information can sometimes be found in the strangest of places. An inquiry caught my eye. Someone was looking for info on her grandmother, a Marchetti from Nuremberg, Pennsylvania who was married to a Bott. Hmmmm … interesting, I thought. Since my paternal grandmother was Angeline Marchetti Genetti from Nuremberg, PA and one of my Genetti grand-aunts was married to a Bott, this post could provide a genealogy lead.

The post was several years old, so I wasn’t sure the email address was still valid. I took a chance and composed a simple message introducing myself, explaining who my ancestors were, and offering the possibility that we could be related. I also included an invitation to visit The Genetti Family Genealogy Project website. Within 24 hours an answer from “FKL” was in my inbox. Yes, she was sure we were related – and possibly in more ways than one!

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Addolorata “Dora” Genetti Bott

Let’s see if you can follow this kinship line. It was confusing even for me!

FKL’s grandmother (Anna) and my grandmother (Angeline) were sisters. OK, that’s an easy one to figure out. Since we share a common great-grandfather, (Angeline and Anna’s father – Giovanni Battista Marchetti) and because we are of the same generation, FKL and I are second cousins.

Now comes the hard part along with a surprising Genetti twist. FKL’s grandfather was Guiseppi Bott (married to Anna Marchetti). Guiseppi was the brother of Verecondo Bott who married my grandfather’s sister, Dora Genetti (my grand-aunt). Are you following so far? Well Dora and Verecondo still have one living child, Helen. Because Dora and my grandfather (Leon Genetti) were siblings, that made my father and Helen first cousins. This means Helen and I are first cousins, once removed. Our closest common ancestors are Damiano Genetti and Oliva Zambotti – my paternal great-grandparents and Helen’s maternal grandparents (meaning that we are of different generations, thus first cousins, once removed). Since Verecondo was Helen’s father, that would make Guiseppi (FKL’s grandfather) Helen’s uncle. Therefore, Helen and FKL are also first cousins, once removed! Yikes! I was awake all night trying to figure this one out!

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October 1906 – Weston, PA. Dora Genetti Bott is #4 and Angeline Marchetti Genetti is #17.
Click on photo to enlarge.

Somehow I had accidentally stumble on multiple connections between three families … and a new 2nd cousin! Since we have many Marchettis and Botts on the Genetti family tree, this was a wonderful discovery. FKL and her sister plan to share their own family genealogy information with me so we can add it to our ever-growing online tree.

I just love these accidental discoveries! They always open my eyes and heart to what a small world we live in!

 

Check out the Genetti Family online tree at: http://genettifamily.tribalpages.com/