Category: Ancestors

Tyrolean Wisdom Stories #4

SanNicolo1800s

San Nicolo Church, Castelfondo, late 1800’s

Proverbs from Trentino:

Dialect: Tutti li cimi scorla.

Translation: All genius are somewhat disturbed.

 

Dialect: Chi zappa, zacca e chi mette giù, tol su.

Translation: The one that hoes, eats; the one that sow, reaps.

 

Proverbs courtesy of Filo Magazine: A Journal for Tyrolean Americans.

Visit Filo for a fascinating glimpse into our ancestral arts, culture, cuisine, history and much, much more!

Tyrolean Wisdom Stories #3

Damiano Genetti

Cosma Damiano Genetti in doorway of Genetti home in Castelfondo.

Proverbs from Trentino:

Dialect: Mort, fech e amor, l’é trei robes che no se sarà mai bogn de scone.

Translation: Death, fire and love can not be hidden.

 

Dialect: Ò prèst ὀ tardi sé paga tut.

Translation: One does not know if the remedy is worse than the cure.

 

Proverbs courtesy of Filo Magazine: A Journal for Tyrolean Americans.

Visit Filo for a fascinating glimpse into our ancestral arts, culture, cuisine, history and much, much more!

Tyrolean Wisdom Stories #2

CastelfondoWell

Central piazza fountain – Castelfondo

Proverbs from Trentino:

Dialect: Se t eves ben, te perdones dut, se to odies no te perdones nia.

Translation: If you love, you forgive; if you hate, you forgive nothing.

 

Dialect: Vardavene da n om che fila, da na femena che scigola e da la bocia de n cian.

Translation: Beware of a man who spins, a woman who whistles and the mouth of a dog.

 

Proverbs courtesy of Filo Magazine: A Journal for Tyrolean Americans.

Visit Filo for a fascinating glimpse into our ancestral arts, culture, cuisine, history and much, much more!

Tyrolean Wisdom Stories

CastelfondoVideo

Village of Castelfondo, Val di Non, Trentino

Proverbs from Trentino:

Dialect: A pagàr e a morìr se fa simper en temp.

Translation: To pay and to die, one does in time.

 

Dialect: Colazion bonora, disnàr a la so ora, a zena ‘n pochetòt, se te vòi viver tantòt.

Translation: Early breakfast, a punctual lunch, and light supper for a long life.

 

Proverbs courtesy of Filo Magazine: A Journal for Tyrolean Americans.

Visit Filo for a fascinating glimpse into our ancestral arts, culture, cuisine, history and much, much more!

The Long and Winding Road of Genealogy, Part 4

NuremburgGroup1

Date: October 1906. Place: In front of the boarding house and saloon owned by Raffaele Genetti in Weston, PA. The photograph commemorates a double wedding: (5 + 6, 8 + 9). 1. Silvio Genetti, 2. Peter Zambotti, 3. St. Clair, 4. Dora Genetti Bott, 5. Richard Fedrizzi, 6. Angeline Cologna Fedrizzi, 7. Tillie Genetti Zambotti, 8. Peter Dallachiesa, 9. Virginia Fedrizzi Dallachiesa, 10. William Dona, 11. Max Martini, 12. Joseph Fedrizzi, 13. John Springhetti, 14. Josephine Dona, 15. Florence Yannes,
16. Nela Recla, 17. Angeline Marchetti Genetti

It’s time to wrap-up the series I began a month ago. In the process of researching connections between the Genetti, Zambotti, Dallachiesa and Marchetti families, the photograph that began the entire inquiry now comes into focus as a wonderful snapshot of sibling/cousin relationships. Let’s take a closer look at our ancestors and how their lives are intertwined.

First – the boarding house/saloon where the photograph was taken, is owned by Raffaele Genetti and his wife, Lucia Zambotti. The group photo commemorates a double wedding that took place in 1906.

#1 – Silvio Genetti is the oldest son of Raffaele and Lucia (owners of the establishment). He is the 1st cousin of #2 – Peter Zambotti, #4 – Dora Genetti Bott, #7 – Tillie Genetti Zambotti and #8 – Peter Dallachiesa.

#2 – Peter Zambotti is holding Silvio’s hand. Peter and Silvio are 1st cousins because Peter’s father is Lucia Zambotti Genetti’s brother. Therefore Peter is the nephew of Raffaele and Lucia Genetti. He is also the cousin of #2 – Dora Genetti Bott, #7 – Tillie Genetti Zambotti and #8 – Peter Dallachiesa.

#4 – Dora Genetti Bott is the niece of Raffaele and Lucia because her father is the brother of Raffaele and her mother is the sister of Lucia. She is the sister of #7 – Tillie Genetti Zambotti and the 1st cousin to #1 – Silvio Genetti, #2 – Peter Zambotti and #8 – Peter Dallachiesa.

#5 – Richard Fedrizzi is one of the grooms in this wedding photo. He is the sibling of # 9 – Virginia Fedrizzi Dallachiesa and #12 – Joseph Fedrizzi. His wife is #6 – Angeline Cologna. The Fedrizzi family is from San Biago, Trento – not Castelfondo.

#6 – Angeline Cologna Fedrizzi is the bride of Richard Fedrizzi. Her mother was Rachele Yannes. She most likely is the cousin of #14 – Florence Yannes.

#7 – Tillie Genetti Zambotti is the sister of #4 – Dora Genetti Bott, the niece of Raffaele and Lucia Genetti, and cousin to #1 – Silvio Genetti, #2 – Peter Zambotti and #8 – Peter Dallachiesa. In 1911, Tillie and Peter Zambotti are married.

#8 – Peter Dallachiesa is the second groom. His mother, Maria Zambotti, and Lucia Zambotti Genetti are sisters. He marries #9 – Virginia Fedrizzi. Peter is the nephew of Raffaele and Lucia Genetti, and the 1st cousin of #1 – Silvio Genetti, #2 – Peter Zambotti, #4 Dora Genetti Bott and #7 – Tillie Genetti Zambotti.

#9 – Virginia Fedrizzi Dallachiesa marries #8 – Peter Dallachiesa. She is the sister of #5 – Richard Fedrizzi and #12 – Joseph Fedrizzi.

#10 – William Dona is most likely related in some way to #15 – Josephine Dona.

#12 – Joseph Fedrizzi is the sibling of #5 – Richard Ferdrizzi and #9 – Virginia Fedrizzi.

#14 – Josephine Dona is most likely related in some way to #10 – William Dona.

#15 – Florence Yannes is probably the cousin of #6 – Angeline Cologna Fedrizzi (Angeline’s mother was Rachele Yannes). She is also the 1st cousin of #17 – Angeline Marchetti Genetti because her mother, Philomena Marchetti, and Angeline’s father, John Marchetti, are siblings.

#16 – Nela Recla (Leonela Erminia Recla) is the niece of Raffaele and Lucia Genetti because her mother, Angela Maddalena Genetti, is Raffaele Genetti’s sister. She is the 1st cousin of #1 – Silvio Genetti, #4 – Dora Genetti Bott and #7 – Tillie Genetti Zambotti. She is also cousins through marriage to #2 – Peter Zambotti and #8 – Peter Dallachiesa.

#17 – Angeline Marchetti Genetti marries the nephew of Raffaele and Lucia Genetti, Leon Genetti, in 1914. She is the 1st cousin of #15 – Florence Yannes. Through marriage she becomes the sister-in-law of #2 – Peter Zambotti, #4 – Dora Genetti Bott and #7 – Tillie Genetti Zambotti.

There are a few people in this photograph that I am unable to verify their relationship to the bridal couples: #3 – St. Clair, #10 – William Dona, #11 – Max Martini, #13 – John Springhetti, and #14 – Josephine Dona. Considering the connections stated above, I’m sure a cousin relationship will eventually be found for these as well.

This series began with the inquiries of three cousins: Arleen Dallachiesa, Melissa Stidom and Erin Johnston, who did not know each other when they wrote me. Their ancestors came together over a hundred years ago to celebrate two weddings. I know many of you reading this post can also claim ancestral connections to those portrayed in the photograph, as can I.

At times, the research for this series gave me a headache! I created many diagrams to keep the relationships straight. Around each turn there was a new discovery. Often I wandered if our ancestors were aware of their extensive interconnections. Were they as boggled by their cousin bonds as I was? And to think, this is only a tiny part of our family’s long and winding road of genealogy.

Many thanks to Arleen Dallachiesa, Melissa Stidom, Erin Johnston and Don Lingousky. Your contributions of information helped piece this complicated ancestral puzzle together.

Read the entire series:

The Long and Winding Road of Genealogy, Part 1

The Long and Winding Road of Genealogy, Part 2

The Long and Winding Road of Genealogy, Part 3

 

The American Immigrant Wall of Honor

William Genetti, Morgan MacDonaldThank you to William Genetti and Morgan MacDonald for sharing photos of their recent visit to The American Immigrant Wall of Honor located on Ellis Island in New York City. The Wall of Honor is a permanent monument depicting the names of our ancestors who came to America as immigrants, traveling through Ellis Island.

Listed on the wall are William’s grandfather, Gus Genetti, and his great-grandparent’s, Damiano Genetti and Oliva Zambotti Genetti, along with great-aunts and uncles. I have to admit, this gave me a little shiver of pride to see the names of my ancestors memorialized on this wall, (Damiano and Oliva were also my great-grandparents).

 

 

Immigrant Wall of Honor

 

I’ve added one of William’s pics to our Photography Page – take a hop over there to browse our extensive family archive!

Interested in learning more about The American Immigrant Wall of Honor? Click here to visit the Ellis Island Foundation.

Thanks again William and Morgan. What a perfect contribution to our family archive!

 

New Video!

CastelfondoVideo

Photo of Castelfondo by Cristina Paternoster

I just added a new video to our Gallery Video Page. Created by Cristina Paternoster (from Castelfondo), this is a wonderful representation of modern day Commune di Castelfondo. The video clip offers beautiful views of the village, upper pastures, mountains that border the town and mountain huts known as Malgas. Cristina posted the video yesterday on the group Facebook page of: Chei da Chastelfon. I knew it would be the perfect addition to our Video page, offering a glimpse of Castelfondo to those who have never visited our ancestral home.

Thank you Cristina for sharing this video with your American cousins. Grazie mille!

If you are on Facebook, I recommend visiting the public group Chei da Chastelfon (this title is in the Nones dialect – not Italian! It translates as “People from Castelfondo.”). All photographs posted to this group page are little pieces of history and shared by Castelfondo natives. Just click the “Join Group” button and you’ll receive updates in your newsfeed when new photographs and videos are posted. Who knows, you may even spot an ancestor or two among the photos uploaded by your Italian cousins!

 

The Long and Winding Road of Genealogy, Part 3

Continued from Part 2 …

Wedding Photograph in Weston, PA

Date: October 1906. Place: In front of the boarding house and saloon owned by Raffaele Genetti in Weston, PA. The photograph commemorates a double wedding: (5 + 6, 8 + 9).  1. Silvio Genetti, 2. Peter Zambotti, 3. St. Clair, 4. Dora Genetti Bott, 5. Richard Fedrizzi, 6. Angeline Cologna Fedrizzi, 7. Tillie Genetti Zambotti, 8. Peter Dallachiesa, 9. Virginia Fedrizzi Dallachiesa, 10. William Dona, 11. Max Martini, 12. Joseph Fedrizzi, 13. John Springhetti, 14. Josephine Dona, 15. Florence Yannes, 16. Nela Recla, 17. Angeline Marchetti Genetti

During my research of the Dallachiesa family for cousins Arleen and Melissa, I was contacted by Erin Johnston, a descendant of Giulia Anna Marchetti Ossana from Castelfondo. Erin happened upon our website while researching her own Tyrolean family line. She sent me an inquiry wondering if her great-grandmother, Giulia Anna, was related to the Marchetti family that settled in Hazleton/Black Creek, Pennsylvania.

Her email explained further: while searching through our photos, she had made an interesting discovery. Erin noticed that several people noted in the wedding photograph at the top of our Photograph Page were also listed in the 1900 Federal Census, along with her great-grandmother. According to the census, “Anna” lived at the same boarding house in Black Creek, PA with Peter Zambotti (#2 in photo), his brother Alessandro Zambotti, Peter Dallachiesa (#8 – one of the grooms in photo) and his brother Joseph Dallachiesa. Since I had spent three weeks researching all of these ancestors, Erin’s email could not have been more timely. I was sure she had stumbled upon a missing clue – but neither she nor I had any idea what that was!

To rule out the obvious, first I searched my own Marchetti tree (my grandmother was a Marchetti) and found no obvious connection between Erin’s family and mine. Next I went back to the genealogy I was working on for Arleen and Melissa – something immediately caught my eye! The parents of Clemente Dallachiesa, Arleen’s great-grandfather and Melissa’s 2nd great-grandfather, were Pietro Dallachiesa and Barbara Marchetti. (Keep in mind that Clemente’s two sons are Peter and Joseph. Both are listed in the census as living at the same address as Erin’s great-grandmother, Anna, along with Peter and Alessandro Zambotti. Plus the census states they are all close in age.). Perhaps Clemente’s mother, Barbara Marchetti, was related to Erin’s Marchetti line!

I returned to my church records to search for the family of Barbara Marchetti (1818-1895). After some digging, I found what I was looking for! Barbara had a younger brother named Giovanni Marchetti (B: 1823) who was the father of Giulia Anna. Therefore, Erin’s great-grandmother was the 1st cousin of Clemente, and the 1st cousin, once removed of his sons, Peter and Joseph Dallachiesa. And Clemente’s sister, Catterina Dallachiesa (also Anna’s 1st cousin), married Simone Zambotti. Therefore, their sons, Peter and Alessandro Zambotti, were Anna’s 1st cousins, once removed too. So it appears that a group of cousins (Dallachiesa, Zambotti and Marchetti) all came to America at about the same time, were all about the same age, and lived at the same boarding house!

To go a little further into our analysis, here is the cousin relationship between Arleen, Melissa, Erin and me:

  • Arleen and Melissa are 2nd cousins, once removed through the Dallachiesa family.
  • Arleen and Erin are 4th cousins through the Marchetti family.
  • Melissa and Erin are 4th cousins, once removed through the Marchetti family.
  • Arleen and I are 3rd cousins through the Zambotti family.
  • Melissa and I are 3rd cousins, once removed through the Zamobtti family.
  • Arleen and I are 4th cousins, through the Genetti family.
  • Melissa and I are 4th cousins, once removed through the Genetti family.
  • Erin and I are not related – at the time of this writing I have not found a connecting ancestor, but there may still be one.

Yes, I’m just as confused as you are by the over-lapping cousin relationships!

However, Erin’s insights have shed an entirely new light on the wedding photograph (see above) of 1906! I’ll explain more in my next blog post.

To be continued …

 

Read this entire blog series:

The Long and Winding Road of Genealogy, Part 1

The Long and Winding Road of Genealogy, Part 2

The Long and Winding Road of Genealogy, Part 2

Continued from Part 1 …

Allesandro (Alex) Zambotti Family Weston 1940s

Alessandro (Alex) Zambotti with wife Mary Dallachiesa, photographed in Weston, PA – 1940’s

If you remember our last post, I am now corresponding with Melissa Stidom and Arleen Dallachiesa. We have determined their shared ancestors are Clemente Dallachiesa and Maria Zambotti, and that Melissa and Arleen are 2nd cousins, once removed (as well as 3rd cousins with me!).

Both cousins have provided me with information on their family lines, stretching back three generations. I compiled all of the info into one long list and began the task of verifying and mapping the family genealogy. My main resource for checking ancestors born in Castelfondo is a large digital archive I maintain on my hard drive. The file contains copies of original baptismal, marriage and death records from the village church spanning about four hundred years. For those born in America I use records from Ancestry.com, FamilySearch, Find-A-Grave and other online genealogy resources. Slowly I began to piece together birth dates, matched up spouses, found additional births of children who did not survive to adulthood, and added as much information as possible to our original family list. I also included Clemente’s parents, Pietro Dallachiesa (1816-1855) and Barbara Marchetti (1818-1895) along with his four siblings, expanding my research back one more generation. Remember – I already had an extensive genealogy for Maria Zambotti, Clemente’s wife, because she is the sister of my great-grandmother Oliva Zambotti Genetti. I have records dating this family back six generations for their Zambotti line, twelve generations for their Genetti line, and three generations for their Covi line.

Fortunato (Tuno) & Grace Dallachiesa 1963

Fortunato (Tuno) and Grace Dallachiesa, 1963. Tuno is the son of Clemente Dallachiesa and Maria Zambotti. Tuno and Grace are also the grandparents of Arleen Dallachiesa.

As I sorted through Clemente’s siblings (Maria, Antonio, Pietro and Catterina), I was surprised to find numerous matches between the Dallachiesa family and the Zambotti family. This is when the research REALLY became interesting!

If you are familiar with the Genetti family of Pennsylvania, you also know there are numerous marriages between Zambotti and Genetti ancestors from this branch of the family. As I continued my research, it became evident that the three families overlapped in many places.

Yikes – it became so confusing that I had to diagram the relationships in order to enter them correctly into our tree! If not careful, it’s easy to duplicate a person that appears on two different branches of the tree and is related to multiple ancestors from different families.

Here’s what I found when I combined the Dallachiesa research with the genealogy of my own Genetti-Zambotti family line:

  • Maria Dallachiesa (1841-1917) marries Francesco Mattia Covi (1834-1886) who is the uncle of Simone, Maria, Oliva and Lucia Zambotti (the brother of their mother, Maria Domenica Covi).
  • Clemente Dallachiesa (1844-1905) marries Maria Zambotti (1854-1906) who is the sister of Simone, Oliva and Lucia Zambotti.
  • Catterina Dallachiesa (1853-1939) marries Simone Zambotti (1852-1923) brother of Maria, Oliva and Lucia Zambotti.
  • Damiano Genetti marries Oliva Zambotti (1861-1938) who is the sister of Simone, Maria and Lucia Zambotti.
  • Rafaele Genetti, brother of Damiano, marries Lucia Zambotti (1865-1952) who is the sister of Simone, Maria and Oliva Zambotti.
  • Pietro Zambotti (1881-1966), son of Simone Zambotti and Catterina Dallachiesa, marries Ottilia Genetti (1890-1985), the daughter of Damiano Genetti and Oliva Zambotti.
  • (Giuseppe) Alessandro Zambotti (1878-1951), son of Simone Zambotti and Catterina Dallachiesa, and brother of Pietro, marries Mary Dallachiesa (1882-1967), daughter of Clemente Dallachiesa and Maria Zambotti.
  • Simone, Maria, Oliva and Lucia Zambotti’s grandmother was Maria Barbara Genetti (1796-1844), married to Simone Zambotti (1786-1874). She was the 4th cousin, once removed of Damiano and Rafaele Genetti of Pennsylvania (and the aunt to Vigilio Genetti, who’s branch of the Genetti family immigrated to Illinois – see past blog post). The father of Simone, Maria, Oliva and Lucia – Alessandro Zambotti, (whose mother was Maria Barbara Genetti) also had a grandmother on his father’s side who was Lucia Genetti (1761-1816). At the time of this writing, I have yet to find the connection of Lucia to the rest of the Genetti family tree.

Are you completely confused? I certainly was! But clearly, the Dallachiesa family was closely related to the Genetti family and should be added to our ongoing genealogy project.

With the final results of this extensive ancestral dig completed – we added 70 new names and 20 photographs to our online tree, plus found many pieces of our family puzzle. Special thanks to Arleen Dallachiesa and Melissa Stidom for their wonderful contributions!

And yet – there’s still more to this story!

To be continued …

The Long and Winding Road of Genealogy, Part 1

Maria and Clemente Dallachiesa and family.

Maria Zambotti and Clemente Dallachiesa, married 1875. Family portrait, circa. 1887-1888, photographed in Castelfondo.

Genealogy doesn’t always follow a straight, clear path. Sometimes you start researching one branch of the family and before you know it, you’re lost in a maze of in-laws, family cross-overs and distant cousins leading to a completely different surname! Although often confusing, it’s worth the effort to travel down side streets, for they all contain a hidden surprise!

That’s exactly what happened to me during the past month. I was contacted by three different cousins, looking for info on their ancestors. Although indirectly related to the Genetti clan, I took on the task of researching their family connections and was amazed at what I discovered!

I knew most families who came from Castelfondo, Italy (Austria) were interrelated. It’s a small village and your choice of a marriage partner was usually limited. Marriages were often arranged between families and it was common for distant cousins to marry. By the time I finished putting together the puzzle pieces of this branch (which includes the surnames of Dallachiesa, Zambotti, Marchetti, Genetti, Ianes and Turri – all from Castelfondo) I had a clearer picture of just how complicated cousin connections can be when your family originates from a small town in the Italian Alps!

Since this is a long, complicated story … I’ll break it into several blog posts. You’ll soon see why!

Fred Dallachiesa (1921-2014)

Fred Dallachiesa (1921-2014)

First let’s start with Arleen Dallachiesa. Arleen contacted me back in June (see past blog post). She already had a good family genealogy mapped out and was wondering about the connection of her father Fred Dallachiesa to the Genetti family, since she believed Fred and Gus Genetti Sr. were cousins. It didn’t take long to find the connection – Fred’s grandmother was Maria Zambotti Dallachiesa (1854-1906), older sister to Gus’s mother Oliva Zambotti Genetti (1861-1938). Fred and Gus were first cousins, once removed. Plus Maria and Oliva’s grandmother, who married into the Zambotti family, was Maria Barbara Genetti (1796-1844), an ancestor of the Genetti branch who immigrated to Illinois. So Arleen was related to me twice, as a 3rd cousin through the Zambotti family and a 4th cousin through the Genetti family.

Gus Genetti Sr. (1892-1976)

Gus Genetti Sr.
(1892-1976)

I decided to add Arleen’s great-grandparents, Maria Zambotti and Clemente Dallachiesa (1844-1905) to our online tree since they were related to the Genetti family through two different branches. Arleen and I kept in-touch for several months, solving a few mysteries and swapping research.

Then a month ago, I received a request through Ancestry.com from Melissa Stidom. She was looking for information on her 2nd great-grandfather, Clemente Dallachiesa. Wow, I thought, what were the chances of two cousins (who did not know each other) contacting me through the Dallachiesa family connection! I knew that Melissa was certainly related to Arleen! After counting the generations, I concluded Arleen and Melissa were 2nd cousins, once removed. Both were related through the Dallachiesa, Zambotti and Genetti families. This was just too much of a coincidence! I knew I had to dig deeper into our shared family connections – and that’s when my research took an unusual turn down a new road of discovery!

To be continued …