Category: Cousins

New Photo Gallery!

Vigilio and Maria Genetti

Vigilio and Maria Genetti of Illinois, 1886

It’s finally completed! Our new Photo Gallery is finished and online! You’ll find the direct link located in the Main Menu at the top of each page of our website, fourth link from the left under the title: Photo Gallery.

During the past year, I received many family photographs from different branches of the Genetti family. Since our old Photograph page had grown extremely large and cumbersome, the only possible solution for adding new images was to reorganize everything into manageable sections and republish as a separate gallery. After much thought, I came up with the solution to divide our photos into individual pages representing each state where our ancestors settled after arriving in the USA. We now have photo pages for: Pennsylvania, Wyoming, Illinois, Michigan, Washington and of course, our ancestral home of Castelfondo.

Many more names, dates and stories have been added to each page in the Photo Gallery. I hope with the addition of these details, I have created a descriptive account of family life, trials and tribulations encountered by our ancestors in their new country.

Our thanks to John Nimmo, great-grandson of Peter Menghini, who contributed many wonderful group photos to the Wyoming Genetti page.

Another thank you to Sharon Genetti Cain, great-granddaughter of Vigilio and Maria Genetti, for the exceptional collection of vintage images that now compose our Illinois Genetti page.

And finally, a big thank you to our friends and cousins in Italy who contributed several new photographs to our Castelfondo page as well as to other sections in our Photo Gallery. Mille grazie to Dino Marchetti, Giovanni Marchetti and Lidia Genetti.

Leone Genetti

Leone Genetti, Castelfondo, 1871

You might wonder why it has taken so long to see your photo memories appear on the Genetti Family Genealogy Project. Here is a “behind-the-scenes” glimpse at the process!

Upon receiving a new grouping of photographs, I first sort through the collection to determine if they are: 1. Genetti descendants and 2. they fit with the general theme of our website.

But before I can publish any new photo, there is much prep work involved. If possible, I prefer photographs to be sent via email as hi-res digital JPGs, along with names, dates, places, etc. This allows for the greatest working latitude with the images. Plus sending along photo details lays the groundwork for a story to go along with your family portraits.

However, this is not always the case and most photographs I receive require I great deal of attention before they are ready for our family website. Often the files arriving in my inbox are low-resolution, in need of restoration and have either no information or just a minimal title to identify them. And sometimes I receive packages by mail containing actual photos or newspaper clippings. In any case, every photo needs to be “prepped” and authenticated before it can be added to our gallery.

I begin by uploading (or in the case of hard copy photos – scanning) the images into Photoshop. I then try to increase clarity by using various filters and adjusting the tone of the photo. Next comes digitally repairing rips and tears, getting rid of dust spots and generally cleaning up the the image, restoring it to as close to original appearance as possible. After that, each photo must be resized to the correct resolution for online publishing. Now I’m ready for research!

If only basic information has been sent to me, I first locate the ancestor in my offline family tree (to date, I have collected information on over 1,700 family members beginning in the mid-1400’s up to present day living descendants). If I can’t find the ancestor on our tree or there just isn’t enough information in their file, I need to start researching using a variety of online resources such as Ancestry.com, FamilySearch.org and Find-A-Grave. After authenticating the people in the photo and finding enough information to compile a short story, I need to date the photograph. Sometimes I’m lucky and a date will be written on the photo or provided by the family, but usually this is not the case. Then I must put on my detective hat and estimate the year in which the photo was taken. I do this by using the following clues: determining the age of the subjects, the era of clothing style they are wearing, type of hairstyle they have, jewelry being worn and sometimes even identifying the background. All of these elements can offer clues to an approximate date.

After identifying the photo’s subjects, place and date, I am ready to publish your family memories to our website!

So take a stroll through the history of the Genetti family, see if you recognize any of your ancestors and enjoy browsing our new Photo Gallery.

Our many, many thanks to everyone who has contributed to our website! With your help, we have grown the Genetti Family Genealogy Project into an extensive resource, not only for our family, but also for the many Tyroleans who visit our website daily.

Grazie a tutti i nostri cugini di tutto il mondo (thank you to all of our cousins throughout the world)!

 

We welcome all contributions to the Genetti Family Photo Gallery. Please send me a direct message through our Contact page for directions on how to submit photographs.

 

 

The Traveling Genealogist: Part 1 – London, Berlin and a Cousin Coincidence!

Louise and Michael at the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin, Germany

Where in the world is Louise? Have you been wondering why I haven’t posted in a while? Well my summer was filled with art projects and redesigning my personal website: LaRoach.Art. In case you didn’t know, I am a digital artist/designer. Genealogy is my hobby. So if my spare time is in short supply, my family research sometimes ends up on the shelf until I have an extended period of quiet time necessary to concentrate on old records.

But when September rolled around this year, Europe beckoned!

My husband and I share a love of travel and exploration. Every year we get out-of-town and experience a new city, country or culture. This year we chose Berlin, Salzburg and Florence to visit, also sandwiching two weeks in the middle of our trip to see cousins and friends in Bolzano, Fondo, Castelfondo and Trent (Northern Italy). Along the way I documented art, visited churches and enjoyed the rich culture of Germany, Austria and Italy.

I am 50% Tyrolean (Trentini) and 50% German/Prussian. Although this was my 3rd trip to Italy and I am very familiar with my Genetti origins, culture and ancestral home, I know little about my German ancestry. Not having visited Germany or Austria on past trips, this was an opportunity to experience the blending of cultures that make up my DNA.

Louise with one of the Tower’s Beefeaters

Michael and I flew into Heathrow Airport and decided to begin out trip with a few days in London Town. The Tower of London was a short walk from our hotel and since we had missed this site on a previous visit to England, we decided to spend the day walking through the murky legacy of England’s infamous prison. I snapped closeups of interesting architectural details, had my photo taken with a Yeoman Warder (also known as a Beefeater), and marveled at the tales of historical figures imprisoned throughout the tower’s lengthy history.

Tower of London

Our next destination was Berlin, Germany. My husband had chosen this city and I was also curious to see modern Berlin. Our AirBnB was a short walk from Checkpoint Charlie and one section of the Berlin Wall, important locations when the country and city were politically and physically divided by Cold War Russia. Since the Berlin Wall was both erected and eventually torn down within my lifetime, (yes I am old enough to remember the beginning of the wall), this was a point in history that I could identify with, as well as compare to our current political turmoil. Although this is an ugly part of Berlin history, particularly because it took place only 16 short years after the devastation of WW 2, I applaud the German people and their effort to remember and document what happened, in an effort to never allow the separation of people and state to take place again.

While in Berlin I had a most unusual cousin experience. I am friends on Facebook with various cousins in the United States, Austria, England and Italy. We had just arrived in Berlin and I happened to see a Facebook post by one of my 2nd cousins Maria Genetti, daughter of Gus and Val Genetti of Pennsylvania. (FYI – Maria’s grandfather and my grandfather were brothers. To be a 2nd cousin you share a set of great-grandparents. Maria, her siblings and I have the common ancestors of Damiano Genetti and Oliva Zambotti.)

In the Facebook post Maria was celebrating Oktoberfest in Munich with a large mug of frothy beer. How funny, I thought, Maria is also in Germany! I sent her a message that I was in Germany too, but a few hours away in Berlin. Maria responded that she had already flown home and was posting from the US, but that her sister, Patricia, had been vacationing in Malta and was flying home through Berlin. She thought it might be possible for the two of us to meet up. Maria sent a message to her sister and soon I received a text from Patricia. Yes, she was in Berlin for just two days and could we rendezvous the following day. Although we were in different parts of the city, Patricia managed to maneuver the underground system and we met for a pleasant chatty cousin dinner at an Italian Trattoria around the corner from our apartment.

Michael Roach, Patricia Genetti, Louise Genetti Roach in Berlin

The next day Patricia flew home and by the end of the week, we were on our way to picturesque Salzburg, Austria.

What are the odds of two American cousins showing up in the same German city at the same time without the knowledge that either were even traveling?! What a very strange cousin coincidence this was indeed! It never ceases to amaze me just how small the world really is and how we are all connected!

A shout-out to Patricia Genetti! Thank you for a memorable evening in Berlin. Perhaps we will stumble upon each other again in our future travels.

Since this series of blog posts is centered around family connections and genealogy, I am writing about my art adventures in Europe over at my other blog. You can read the first post in my “Artful Traveler” series at: LaRoach.Art

Look for more stories from my 2018 trip in future blog posts. Until then – ciao e una abbrattio.

 

 

Cugini?

Massimino and Camillo Genetti, probably late 1920’s, photo courtesy of Giovanni Marchetti.

I am FaceBook friends with Gemma Genetti. She lives in Merano, a beautiful historical city in northern Italy. Gemma’s roots are from Castelfondo, the ancestral village of the Genetti family. Over the past few years we have kept in touch and were sure we were related. But somehow the link between our families eluded me – until yesterday.

I saw a FaceBook comment Gemma made under a photograph of her father and uncle posted in “Chei da Chastelfon,” a private FB group that we both belong to. The group publishes many historical documents and photos of scenes and people from Castelfondo. Yesterday I was staring at a portrait posted by the group administrator, Giovanni Marchetti, of Massimino Genetti and his brother Camillo in military uniform. As I translated the comments below the photo, a realization came to me. I might be able to match up the two siblings in the town’s baptismal records. If I could find both siblings, plus their sister Anna (mentioned in one of the comments) I would have the correct ancestors for this family. Since we have many repetitive names on our tree (such as Pietro, Giovanni and Fortunato) this is not always an easy task. But if all of the siblings’ records matched and I had the exact names of their parents and grandparents, I could positively identify the branch of their ancestors.

Part of Genetti Family Tree showing Antonio and Veronica Genetti with their six sons.

Within an hour I had scanned through pages of Castelfondo records prior to 1925 and found two of the three siblings. The baptismal records had exactly the information I was searching for. I glanced up at the family tree hanging above my desk and immediately saw Gemma’s grandfather, Pietro!

Grabbing a piece of paper, I drew a descendant chart for Gemma and another for me – and yes, we shared a set of great-grandparents! Our 3rd great-grandparents, Giovanni Battista Antonio Genetti (1789-1852) and Veronica Paniza (1789-1871) are one in the same. That means my 2nd great-grandfather, Leone Genetti (1826-1909) and Gemma’s 2nd great-grandfather, Francesco Genetti (1818-?) were brothers. After counting down the generations, I concluded Gemma and I are 4th cousins (cugini) from the same branch of the Genetti family. Yea!

It’s always exciting to find our genealogical connections and to acknowledge those that came before us. The life paths our families chose were different and yet we have a deep connection through DNA and ancestral heritage. Gemma’s great-grandfather, Fortunato, stayed in Italy. My great-grandfather, Damiano, came to America. Two different countries, two different families, two different languages – and yet connected six generations in the past.

A special hello and thank you (ciao e grazie) to Gemma Genetti, Giovanni Marchetti and all of the wonderful members of Chei da Chastelfon. I have so enjoyed connecting to my Trentino heritage through your posts and photos.

The Passing of Leon A. Genetti Jr.

Leon Genetti with his great-granddaughters at Genetti Family Reunion, 2016

With much sadness, I bring you the news that my uncle, Leon A. Genetti Jr. of Hazleton, PA passed away suddenly on Monday, December 18th while at home. He was 89 years old, just two months shy of his 90th birthday. Leon was the son of Leon and Angeline (Marchetti) Genetti, and the grandson of Damiano and Oliva (Zambotti) Genetti.

Obituary:

Standard Speaker, Hazleton, Pennsylvania – December 21, 2017

Leon A. Genetti, 89, of Hazle Twp. passed away Tuesday [note: actual death date was Monday, December 18, 2017] at his home.

Born in Hazleton, he was the son of the late Leon A. and Angeline (Marchetti) Genetti and was a member of Queen of Heaven Parish at Our Lady of Grace Church, Hazleton.

Leon was affiliated with the Genetti supermarket chain and owned a local trucking company for that firm. He later owned Hazleton Engine and Brake Co. and operated it with his two sons, Leon and David.

He was an avid fisherman, had his private pilot’s license and had a love for flying.

Preceding him in death, in addition to his parents, were his wife, the former Marie Passarelli, in 2014; brothers, Joseph and John Genetti; and sisters, Catherine Farkus, Rita Young and Adeline Kashi [note: another sister, Joyce, passed away in 1934].

Surviving are his sons, Leon J. and his wife, Diane, Hazle Twp.; David P., Wake Forest, N.C.; and Michael A., Drums; grandchildren, Leon Scott, Ross, Jillian, Lori and Chandra; great-grandchildren, Kaylee Grace and Kelsey Rose; and numerous nieces and nephews.

His funeral will be held Saturday [December 23, 2017] at 9 a.m. at Joseph A. Moran Funeral Home, 229 W. 12th St., Hazleton, Pennsylvania.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. in Queen of Heaven Parish at Our Lady of Grace Church.His funeral will be held Saturday [December 23, 2017] at 9 a.m. at Joseph A. Moran Funeral Home, 229 W. 12th St., Hazleton, Pennsylvania.

Burial will be in Our Lady of Grace Cemetery.

Friends may call Friday from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Hazleton Animal Shelter, P.O. Box 481, Hazleton, PA 18201, or to the Hazle Twp. Fire and Rescue Department, P.O. Box 499, Harleigh, PA 18225.

Condolences may be sent through http://www.moranfuneralhome.com

[webpage for condolences: click here]

Webmaster Note: Visit Leon’s Tribute page on the Genetti Family Genealogy Project website: https://genettifamily.com/leon-a-genetti-jr/

If the family would like to contribute addition photos to our Tribute page, please send them to: info.genetti.family@gmail.com. 

Goodbye to Olivia Reich Hearn

Sadly we say goodbye to our cousin Olivia Ann Reich Hearn who passed from this life on December 10, 2017. She is the daughter of Lewis Reich (1908–2003) and Elizabeth (Zambotti) Reich (1912-1995); and the granddaughter of Peter Zambotti (1881-1966) and Tilly (Genetti) Zambotti (1890-1985).

Obituary: 

Date of Birth: April 30, 1942

Date of Death: December 10, 2017

Olivia was born in Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania, to Lewis and Elizabeth (Zambotti) Reich.

She received her Registered Nursing Degree in 1964 at Hazleton State School of Nursing, Hazleton, Pennsylvania, with emphasis on psychiatric care. Immediately after graduation, Olivia worked at the Veterans Administration (VA) Hospital in New York City as a Psychiatric Care Nurse. She left that position in 1968 to ski in the mountains of Utah (Alta). In Utah, she worked as a Registered Nurse in the Salt Lake City VA until 1972 when she moved with her husband to Hebo, Oregon. She was a dedicated mother, homemaker, and for a short time in 1990’s worked as a librarian at Holy Trinity Catholic School, Beaverton, Oregon.

She was married on February 19, 1971 to her husband, Vern Hearn, at Hill AFB, Utah.

Olivia was an active member of St. Pius X Catholic Church since 1973 and served in several volunteer positions. Most notably, she taught Junior High Religious Education (CCD), served on the Funeral Committee, was a church board member, and a member of the Women’s Club. In the 1980’s, she served as a volunteer and key organizer for the Cedar Mill Community Library. In recent years, she found a great deal of pleasure in being a “room mother” for a William Walker Elementary School Kindergarten class until she was no longer physically able. She really enjoyed working with those kids.

Her hobbies included needlepoint, sewing, maintaining her reading library, traveling, gardening, as well as watching old movies, BBC International and History Channel (AKA WWII Channel).

Olivia is survived by her Husband, Vern; Daughter, Charis; son, Joel; brothers, Conrad and Lewis Reich; and sister, Ann Marie Shelby. She was preceded in death by her parents and son, Nathan.

Olivia’s Viewing and Rosary Service will be held on Sunday, December 17, 2017, starting at 6:00 PM at Springer and Son, Aloha Funeral Home, 4150 SW 185th Ave, Beaverton, Oregon.

Her Funeral Mass will be held at St. Pius X Catholic Church, 1280 NW Saltzman Road, Portland, Oregon, on Monday, December 18, 2017, at 1:00 PM. Fr. Julio Torres will be presiding over the Mass and Deacon Bob Little will be the Homilist.

Memorial Donations may be made in Olivia’s honor to any of the following organizations:
Doctors Without Borders (www.doctorswithoutborders.org)
Catholic Relief Services (CRS) (www.crs.org)
Catholic Medical Mission Board (CMMB) (www.cmmb.org)

All viewing and funeral services are be handled by Springer and Son, Aloha Funeral Home, Beaverton, Oregon.

 

Note: Find Olivia’s tribute page on the Genetti family website at:
https://genettifamily.com/olivia-ann-reich-hearn/

 

Asking for Prayers

Family member Anne Marie Shelby is requesting prayers for her sister, Olivia Hearn, who is very ill right now. Anne Marie and Olivia’s grandparents were Peter Zambotti and Tilly Genetti. Please remember Olivia in your heart, thoughts and prayers, with the hope that she regains her health.

Passing of Regina (Jean) Branz Daly

Sadly, we bring the news that another cousin has passed away. Regina (Jean) Branz Daly died on November 20, 2017. She was the daughter of Henry Branz (1897-1971) and Erminia Genetti (1896-1971), and the granddaughter of Damian Genetti (1857-1944) and Oliva Zambotti (1861-1938). A tribute page has been published for Jean along with many lovely photographs contributed by her daughter, Barbara Joliat, commemorating Jean’s life.

To visit the tribute page to Jean Branz Daly, click here.

 

 

Obituary:

WATERBURY – Regina (Jean) E. Daly, widow of Dr. Joseph E. Daly, died Monday, Nov. 20, 2017, at her Waterbury home. She had suffered from the effects of cancer and Parkinson’s disease in recent years, but she remained active until the week prior to her death.

She was born March 21, 1931, in Freeland, Pa., to parents who had emigrated from what was then Val di Non, Tirol, Austria. Her parents [Henry Branz 1897-1971 and Erminia Genetti 1896-1971] instilled in her the principles of hard work and thrift, to which she added her characteristic sense of humor. After graduating from high school, she entered a nursing program at Hazelton Hospital in Hazelton, Pa., and graduated in 1951. She later moved to New York City to become head operating room nurse at New York Polyclinic Hospital, where she met her husband, then a surgical resident.

Jean and Joe married on May 23, 1959, and then moved to Waterbury, where he had lived his whole life. He had been widowed six years earlier, and Jean happily took on the job of raising his five children from his first marriage. They then had one daughter together and were able to live to see their six children grow up and give Jean and Joe 21 grandchildren and 25 great-grandchildren. The youngest three great-grandchildren were born this past year, and Jean was delighted by the continued growth of her large family.

Jean loved her grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and spent many happy years baby-sitting and traveling for baptisms, first communions, graduations and weddings. She enjoyed doting on all of the children and never forgot a birthday or anniversary. In addition to her love of spending time with her family, Jean enjoyed bridge, bowling and tennis with many dear friends. She volunteered extensively – at her beloved parish, St. Margaret, where she assisted with everything from altar linens to planting flowers, and at St. Margaret School, and for many charitable organizations, including Saint Mary’s Hospital and the Heart Fund. She was a longtime member of St. Margaret Ladies Guild and the Theresians. Very few people could keep up with the pace that she set.

Jean leaves behind two sons, Joseph and his wife, Candace, of Peacedale, R.I., and Kevin and his wife, Cheryl, of Summerfield, Fla.; and two daughters, Catherine Canning and her husband, Ray, of Bennington, Vt., and Barbara Joliat and her husband, Christopher, of Waterbury. She was predeceased by two sons, Terrance and Charles.

Funeral and burial will be private. There are no calling hours. The Murphy Funeral Home, 115 Willow St., is in charge of arrangements.

The Passing of Another Cousin

We have sad news to report. One of our Genetti cousins, Edward F. Genetti of Pennsylvania, passed away on November 12th. Born in 1936, Edward was the son of Stanley Genetti (1899-1988) and Eleanor Rauzi (1909-2005), and the grandson of Damiano Genetti (1857-1944) and Oliva Zambotti (1861-1938). He is the husband of Edwina (Roland) and was preceded in death by his first wife Rosemary (Gaudiano). We send our sympathies and condolences to Edward’s family.

FYI – Some interesting news!

garygenettipodcastOur cousin, master glass artist Gary Genetti, was interviewed recently for “Inspirational Creatives” podcast. I love listening to podcasts and this show was of particular interest to me since I also have a background in the arts. Gary’s interview is very insightful, offering a personal glimpse into his creative and life philosophy. Find “Inspirational Creatives” at iTunes. Congrats Gary – great job! Click here to access their website and listen to Inspirational Creatives Podcast. Gary’s episode is #194.

And from one of our cousins in Italy, Chiara Dalla Nogare, here is information about an exchange opportunity between youth in Trentino and the descendants of Trentino immigrants. If you are a Genetti descendant whose family originated in Castelfondo, Trentino – and a young adult, you might be eligible for this fantastic program. The information is available in Italian, English and Spanish. Click here to access the website MondoTrentino. Thank you Chiara for sharing this wonderful program with your American cousins.

Reunion Photos and more!

Reunion 2016

Reunion 2016 – please click for a larger view

Thank you to all who made the journey last week to Hazleton! We had a packed house with a total of 152 attendees at the Saturday evening banquet. I hope you had as much fun as I did – meeting new cousins and sharing stories with lots of hugs to go around. I will certainly remember this reunion with fond memories.

Make sure you visit the Reunion page on our website: https://genettifamily.com/reunion-news/. It has been updated with photos from our family weekend. Want to share your own reunion pics? Please email photos with captions to: info.genetti.family@gmail.com. Let’s share our reunion with cousins throughout the world by adding lots of fun candid photographs to this page. Our special thanks to Patricia Genetti (who did all of our table photos), Diane Genetti (who organized our group photo) and Valeria Genetti Bozek (who photographed candid pics of the Saturday presentations). Your contributions allowed us to have photographs online by Saturday evening!

Thanks to Patricia Genetti, we now have a Facebook public group page where our reunion photos were quickly posted. If you are a member of Facebook, click here to go to the “Genetti Family” public group page – and join! As of today, the page has 92 members.

If you missed our Saturday evening program, “The Genetti Family of Castelfondo: Our Journey to America” we have good news! Bill Genetti had the presentation professionally videotaped and it will soon be produced for sale as a DVD. This presentation will make a fantastic Christmas gift for family members or a historic memento to pass down to future generations.

To order, please send a check for $15 (includes shipping) to:

Bill Genetti (address your check to Bill Genetti)
1345 N. Church St.
Hazle Township, PA 18202

Due to the cost, only a limited number of DVDs are being produced. So don’t delay, order your reunion presentation DVD today!

Genetti Family Tree

Family Tree

And one final note, if you are interested in purchasing a Genetti Family Tree Print, a print of our Coat-of-Arms or a beautiful printed chiffon scarf (one of our many reunion door prizes) you’re in luck. The company that provides our fine art prints (Redbubble) is offering us a one day sale of 20% off on all items through the Redbubble store. This offer is for the Genetti family only (not for the general public)! Hurry – the offer is only valid on Monday, October 17th!!!

Please use the unique coupon code of:
twentyoff-GenettiFamily when checking out. You must place your order by midnight, October 17th to receive the 20% discount.

Here is the Redbubble link to our family page where you will find all of our fine art print products: http://www.redbubble.com/people/genettifamily

You can also find Redbubble Fine Art prints at:
Genetti Family Shop page: https://genettifamily.com/shop-2/

Once again, many thanks to everyone who attended and participated in Reunion weekend!